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WildAid Protects Endangered Sea Turtles in Ecuador

Last month, hundreds of female sea turtles left the safety of the sea to lay thousands of eggs along Ecuador's coast. Park rangers in the Pacoche marine protected area (MPA) have begun patrolling miles of beaches to identify, protect and tag nests with educational materials to prevent predation.

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The Herd is Growing

From Ellen DeGeneres to Lupita Nyong'o and Lang Lang, we are blown away by the global support for the #JoinTheHerd campaign to make this the Year of the Elephant, when we put an end to the ivory trade and allow elephant populations to recover. 

In China, 'Hairy Nose' PSA Fights Smog with Humor

BEIJING (February 25, 2016) — Air pollution in China is unavoidable. Last year, 366 out of 366 cities surveyed failed to meet World Health Organization air quality standards, including Beijing. So perhaps it’s unsurprising that a recent WildAid report found that over 90% of Chinese are concerned about air pollution. 

Pangolins: The Movie

Happy World Pangolin Day!

And what, you may ask, is a pangolin?

Also known as “scaly anteaters,” pangolins are small mammals primarily distinguished by hard, overlapping scales made of keratin, the same protein that constitutes human hair and fingernails. Found in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, pangolins are solitary animals that use their extraordinarily long tongues to probe for ants and termites in mounds and decaying logs. 

In Africa, Ivory Trafficking Controlled By a Powerful Few

The multi billion-dollar ivory trade is controlled by a small number of kingpins who are moving tusks through the Kenyan port of Mombasa, according to an expert panel at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

In a June paper published in the journal Science, University of Washington conservation biologist Samuel Wasser and his colleagues compared DNA samples from African elephant populations with samples extracted from elephant tusks seized between 1996 and 2014. From this genetic analysis, they found two primary poaching hotspots in the continent: one East Africa (particularly Tanzania) and another in protected areas spanning parts of Cameroon, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

Since the study was published, Wasser analyzed another sample of seized tusks found to be freshly poached, moving rapidly from poaching sites to seaports where they are smuggled.

“Not only have we showed that the number of kingpins are fairly limited, because the hotspots are very few, but also we’re showing that there are probably one or two major dealers that are moving all of this ivory out of Mombasa,” Wasser said during the panel.

Read more about the panel via AFP/Hong Kong Free Press.            

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