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Major Singapore Resort Says No to Shark Fin Soup

Resorts World at Sentosa (RWS) today launched a fund to sponsor research, education and conservation efforts related to marine life, to further the marine conservation cause. The RWS Marine Life Fund will dispatch up to SGD$100,000 each year in 2008 and 2009 and up to SGD$1 million each year from 2010 when the Resort opens.

New Report Reveals Human Activities Threaten Survival of Sharks Worldwide

Sharks have thrived in the world's oceans for more than 400 million years, but a comprehensive new report released today by Oceana and WildAid reveals that the world's shark populations have been devastated by human activities. The new report, entitled "End of the Line," shows how the global demand for shark products, and in particular shark fin soup, has prompted gruesome and wasteful fishing practices that could effectively lead to their extinction.

Bo Derek: We all must battle wildlife traffickers

Editor's note: Bo Derek is an actress who starred in the movie "10." Most recently, she starred in the series "Fashion House." She is also an activist working extensively to raise awareness of the costs of wildlife trafficking. She submitted this commentary to CNN's Larry King Live.

When I first visited the Galapagos Islands Marine Reserve, I expected to see an untouched paradise. While it is still beautiful to the naked eye, behind the scenes, all is not well. While there, I learned that the famous sharks of the Galapagos were under siege for their fins.

Sharks in the Soup, Says Conservation Group

A conservation group has warned that sharks could be extinct within a generation unless people lose their appetite for shark fin soup, Reuters reports.

WildAid today called on the Chinese government to act to protect several at-risk species - including Basking, Great White, and Hammerhead - which face increasing pressure as the country's taste for the soup grows with increased wealth.

Chinese Know Little About Shark Conservation - Survey

There is growing public support in China for the need to protect the world's dwindling shark population, but little understanding about the connection between conservation and shark finning, according to a survey.

Shark fin, once offered as a gift to emperors, is traditionally served at Chinese wedding banquets and occasions when the host wants to impress guests with expensive and unusual dishes.

Some also believe it is good for health.

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