Pledge About

Elephants

Lupita Nyong'o Joins Kenyan Celebrities for New Wildlife Campaign

Lupita Nyong'o in Kenya's Amboseli National Park (Kristian Schmidt for WildAid)

NAIROBI (April 27, 2016) — In the run up to the world's largest-ever ivory bonfire, to be conducted by the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) this weekend, popular Afro-pop band Sauti Sol and local radio personality Caroline Mutoko have launched an anti-poaching “hearts and minds” campaign with Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong'o.

Kenya-based African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) and WildAid’s “Poaching Steals from Us All” campaign uses public service announcements, documentary shorts, billboards and social media to urge support for conservation and reporting of wildlife crime. With an initial focus on elephants, the campaign will grow to cover other threatened species, such as lions, rhinos and vultures.

"Many of us know about the poaching crisis, but too many assume that someone else — the government or a conservation group — will take care of it," said Daudi Sumba, Vice President of Program Design for AWF. "If we lose our elephants and other wildlife to this threat, it will not be because we lacked the knowledge or tools to save them, but because we all failed to take ownership of our wildlife heritage. None of us can afford to be bystanders when so much is at stake." 

Lupita Nyong'o visits The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust's Nairobi Elephant Orphanage

Support Kenya: Watch The Ivory Burn Live on April 30

On Saturday, April 30, Kenya Wildlife Service will host the largest ivory burn in history — a bold statement against elephant poaching, and one we hope will mark the beginning of the end for the global ivory trade, which kills an estimated 33,000 elephants every year.

WildAid will be bringing these historic events to a worldwide audience through social media, and we invite you to watch it live.

Our coverage of the event will be carried live via Twitter on Saturday at 3pm in Nairobi (8am in New York), with highlights posted throughout the weekend. In China, WildAid’s Beijing-based team will also be hosting a live mobile stream of The Ivory Burn, as well as projecting a message of support to Kenya onto one of the largest video screens in the world, located in Shanghai’s Bund district.

Hong Kong Chief Executive Reaffirms Ivory Ban Support

Today, Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying met with a delegation of elephant conservation activists and a group of schoolchildren who hand-delivered a thank you card, commending Leung for his January 2016 policy address where he called for a phase-out of the local ivory trade, one of the world's largest.

WildAid, WWF-Hong Kong and Hong Kong lawmaker Elizabeth Quat have been leading efforts in the city to combat wildlife trafficking and to oppose the legal ivory trade. Together, we've been working in close cooperation with Hong Kong Under Secretary for the Environment Christine Loh to drive this urgent policy change. Banning the ivory trade will reduce consumer demand for ivory carvings and other products, and will have a positive impact on African elephant populations as poaching rates decline. 

Yoyo Wong, a five-year-old kindergarten student from Tuen Mun who was at the informal event, said, “Chief Executive, thank you for pledging to save the elephants in Africa. I want to see elephants when I grow up, so please work faster to ban the ivory trade!”

Continue reading... 

Op-ed: Hong Kong’s Ivory Traders Don’t Deserve Compensation

Twenty-six years ago, the world called time on the international trade in elephant ivory, after it had halved African elephant populations within 15 years. Now governments in the US, China and Hong Kong are finally closing the remaining loophole that allowed domestic trade to continue and facilitated a second ivory crisis that has recently been claiming 33,000 elephants a year.

Hopefully, Japan, Thailand and other significant markets will soon follow suit and the elephants can recover. The positive news is that ivory prices have more than halved in China over the past 18 months, that drop apparently starting before the domestic trade bans were announced. Ivory traders at the Hong Kong Trade Development Council’s jewellery fair this month offered us ivory for US$380 a kilogramme, down to 20 per cent of what it was.

In January, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying announced in his annual policy address a plan to phase out the local ivory trade. Amazingly, some traders in Hong Kong are calling for compensation for not being able to continue to sell ivory. This would be totally wrong, if not immoral, given the pivotal role of these traders in stockpiling and bending the rules to create the ivory crisis in the first place. It would be like compensating people for knowingly selling stolen goods, because the law had caught up with them.

Continue reading ...

WildAid Presses SoftBank to Stop Yahoo! Japan’s Ivory Sales

WildAid and the #JoinTheHerd campaign are honored to be among 32 environmental and conservation organizations who have appealed to Yahoo! Japan, the world’s largest internet ivory seller, and its major shareholder SoftBank, to halt all elephant ivory sales on Yahoo! Japan’s shopping and auction sites. An open letter addressed to SoftBank and Yahoo! Japan executives, Masayoshi Son and Nikesh Arora, urges the companies to act now to protect elephants. 

‘Ivory Free’ Bus Billboards to Continue Reducing Demand in Hong Kong

This month, WildAid rolls out its first ever large scale public awareness campaign in Hong Kong on a fleet of about 80 double decker buses. The faces of Chinese celebrities Yao Ming, Li Bingbing, Lang Lang as well as Thai actor Tony Jaa can currently be seen carrying the ‘Ivory Free’ message to the Hong Kong public. The Kowloon Motor Bus Company buses also urge support for an ivory ban proposed by Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.

The Herd is Growing

From Ellen DeGeneres to Lupita Nyong'o and Lang Lang, we are blown away by the global support for the #JoinTheHerd campaign to make this the Year of the Elephant, when we put an end to the ivory trade and allow elephant populations to recover. 

In Africa, Ivory Trafficking Controlled By a Powerful Few

The multi billion-dollar ivory trade is controlled by a small number of kingpins who are moving tusks through the Kenyan port of Mombasa, according to an expert panel at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

In a June paper published in the journal Science, University of Washington conservation biologist Samuel Wasser and his colleagues compared DNA samples from African elephant populations with samples extracted from elephant tusks seized between 1996 and 2014. From this genetic analysis, they found two primary poaching hotspots in the continent: one East Africa (particularly Tanzania) and another in protected areas spanning parts of Cameroon, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

Since the study was published, Wasser analyzed another sample of seized tusks found to be freshly poached, moving rapidly from poaching sites to seaports where they are smuggled.

“Not only have we showed that the number of kingpins are fairly limited, because the hotspots are very few, but also we’re showing that there are probably one or two major dealers that are moving all of this ivory out of Mombasa,” Wasser said during the panel.

Read more about the panel via AFP/Hong Kong Free Press.            

The Story Behind the #JoinTheHerd Elephant

Since our Thursday launch of the #JointheHerd campaign at YearoftheElephant.org, we've received dozens of emails asking who took the iconic photo of a bull elephant now seen in tens of thousands of #JoinTheHerd photos online.

The photographer is Australian-born Shannon Benson, who gives us the backstory:

I was in an area called the Klaserie, which is part of the greater Kruger region of South Africa. It was an early morning drive, and as the sun was rising and we were considering heading back to camp, this majestic beauty appeared as if from nowhere. He confidently swayed his way toward the vehicle.

It was the largest bull elephant I had seen to date, and I was filled with awe, excitement and admittedly intimidation. This shot was captured just before I couldn't zoom back any further while trying to keep him within frame. After that I simply took some close up shots as he passed right by the Land Cruiser and continued on his way. After that I finally took a breath again!

Follow Shannon on Instagram at @shannon__wild

World Celebrities ‘Join the Herd’ to Fight for Africa’s Elephants

Actors, musicians, authors and athletes "joining the herd" Thursday on social media represent five continents and include Academy Award-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o, Yao Ming (former NBA star), Yoko Ono, Ian Somerhalder (Vampire Diaries) & Nikki Reed (The Twilight Saga), Alikiba (Tanzanian music artist), Lang Lang (virtuoso pianist), Maggie Q (Nikita and Scandal), Sir Trevor McDonald (British news presenter), Bo Derek (actress and longtime WildAid ambassador), Kristin Bauer (actress, HBO’s True Blood), Laurie David (American environmental activist), Tony Jaa (Furious 7), Amy Tan (author, The Joy Luck Club), and Li Bingbing (China’s most famous actress).

Launched internationally in both English and Mandarin, the campaign encourages anyone who cares about elephants to #JoinTheHerd by changing their social media profile photo at YearoftheElephant.org or even learn to say the greeting in Chinese. To coincide with the upcoming Chinese New Year, visitors to the website are encouraged to join a cast of celebrities in wishing their social media friends and followers a “Happy Year of the Elephant” — a new twist on welcoming the Chinese Zodiac’s Year of the Monkey on February 8.

Continue reading ... 

Pages