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Ivory Free

‘Ivory Free’ Bus Billboards to Continue Reducing Demand in Hong Kong

This month, WildAid rolls out its first ever large scale public awareness campaign in Hong Kong on a fleet of about 80 double decker buses. The faces of Chinese celebrities Yao Ming, Li Bingbing, Lang Lang as well as Thai actor Tony Jaa can currently be seen carrying the ‘Ivory Free’ message to the Hong Kong public. The Kowloon Motor Bus Company buses also urge support for an ivory ban proposed by Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.

The Herd is Growing

From Ellen DeGeneres to Lupita Nyong'o and Lang Lang, we are blown away by the global support for the #JoinTheHerd campaign to make this the Year of the Elephant, when we put an end to the ivory trade and allow elephant populations to recover. 

Thai Soccer Stars Join WildAid to Fight Ivory Trade

WildAid's "Ivory Free" message is spreading throughout East and Southeast Asia, and now includes a campaign in Thailand, a primary market for ivory products.

Joining such WildAid ambassadors as Thai martial arts star Tony Jaa are three popular sports stars: Coach "Zico" Kiatisuk Senmamuang of Thailand’s national football team, and rising soccer players "Jay" Chanathip Songkrasin and "Kong" Kroekrit Thaweekarn, who recently came together to film a PSA in Bangkok for the campaign.

Maasai Tribesman Leads Hong Kong Ivory Protest

HONG KONG — About 50 people marched noisily through the busy streets of Hong Kong's main ivory trading district of Sheung Wan on Saturday, once again calling on the Hong Kong government to ban the city's out-of-control ivory trade. It is the fifth such street protest in just two years. 

The latest protest was organized by Sean Lee Davies of Project C:Change and Ted Hodgkinson from Hong Kong's The Elephant Society. The star attraction of the protest, billed by Project C:Change as Hong Kong's first “Maasai March,” was Daniel Ole Sambu, a Maasai warrior from Kenya and Predator Protection Programme Coordinator for Big Life Foundation, a Kenya-based NGO that is fighting illegal poaching and habitat destruction.

As Daniel walked amongst the many stores selling ivory, some possibly poached in his own backyard in Tsavo, Kenya, he appeared visibly shaken. According to the South China Morning Post, Daniel said, “It’s horrible because all I see are dead elephants,” Daniel told the South China Morning Post.

A day earlier, WildAid supporter and Hong Kong lawmaker Elizabeth Quat introduced a measure aimed at stepping up government efforts to combat wildlife crime and to ban the city's ivory trade. If passed by Hong Kong's 70 legislators on Wednesday next week, the measure would make it much more difficult for the Hong Kong government to further drag its feet on the issue, triggering the legislative process towards a domestic ivory sales ban sooner rather than later.

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Pressure Mounts for Hong Kong to Ban Ivory Trade

With the United States and China making public commitments to halt the ivory trade, pressure is mounting fast for Hong Kong to do the same. 

Due to its high overall trade volumes, easy access to mainland China, and lax regulation and supervision, Hong Kong is a global hub for the ivory trade. Licensed vendors can legally sell ivory obtained prior to the 1989 international ban on the commercial ivory trade. But the "legal" market is replenshing its original stock with ivory from recently poached elephants.

Two hard-hitting reports out Wednesday uncover this illicit trade that is fuelling the elephant poaching epidemic in Africa. The Washington Post reports that while American and Chinese pledges to enact near-complete bans is historic, the "spotlight is turning to Hong Kong."

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