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Rhinos

Maggie Q Visits Vietnam to Help Save the Rhino from Extinction

With its status symbol allure and alleged medicinal properties, rhino horn is a luxury item in Vietnam, a primary market for horn that’s driving the slaughter of rhinos in Africa.

That’s why in 2014, WildAid and our conservation partners launched “Stop Using Rhino Horn," a three-year campaign with support and cooperation from the government as well as business leaders and media partners, who have contributed $1.6 million in donated media that has reached millions of consumers.

On Friday, WildAid’s Vietnam team welcomed actor Maggie Q, star of the hit CBS TV series "Stalker," and Deputy Chief of Mission of the U.S. Embassy Claire A. Pierangelo to a launch event in Hanoi for the second year of Stop Using Rhino Horn, which now boasts over 40 Vietnamese celebrities spreading this important message.

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Uncharted Territory in Rhino Conservation

WildAid South Africa staffer Adam Welz recently penned an authoritative op-ed for Ensia the challenges in saving Africa's rhinos. As detailed often on this blog, poaching in South Africa has reached alarming levels: 1,215 rhinos were killed in the country last year, compared with 448 in 2011 and 83 in 2008. 

Welz writes:

The high-profile plight of [rhinos] has brought forth a bewildering array of proposed solutions, many of which trigger serious ethical dilemmas, risk unintended and troubling consequences or rely on unproven technology. We’re charging headlong into an era in which new technology may allow us to save species once considered doomed, but also in which threats come in previously unimaginable forms that mainstream wildlife protectors cannot handle. ...

... The steps being taken to save southern white rhinos from the relentless onslaught of ever more organized poachers and traffickers — who sell their horns for extraordinary sums in Asia to consumers who believe that rhino horn cures cancer and other ailments and businesspeople seeking status symbols — are no less fraught with uncertainty.

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Consumer Awareness of Ivory and Rhino Horn Trade’s Impact Grows Rapidly in China

SAN FRANCISCO (March 3, 2015) — Chinese consumer awareness of the ivory and rhino horn trade’s devastating impact on African wildlife has grown rapidly over the past two years, the result of major public awareness campaigns by wildlife organizations and state media, according to two new reports from WildAid, the African Wildlife Foundation and Save the Elephants as part of their joint campaigns in China.

Oped: Anti-Poaching Efforts Must Focus on Reducing Demand

The war against poaching doesn’t have to suffer the same failures as the war on drugs. But on its current course, American foreign policy risks failure at a time of unprecedented poaching across Africa. 

In a Monday oped for the Los Angeles Times, WildAid CEO and co-founder Peter Knights argues that the administration’s implementation plan for its "National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking" may compromise much-needed efforts to measurably reduce global demand for rhino horn, elephant ivory and other wildlife products by failing to marshall adequate resources.

WildAid Convenes Religious Leaders to Fight Poaching in Tanzania

WildAid: Tanzania interfaith workshop

Photo: 52 prominent religious leaders attend an interfaith workshop for wildlife hosted by WildAid in Tanzania on February 11. Courtesy Salome Gasabile

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