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Yao Ming

WildAid and Tencent Announce Strategic Partnership to Promote Wildlife Conservation and Environmental Protection

International conservation organization, WildAid and leading Chinese internet company, Tencent, today announced the formal signing of a strategic partnership agreement to promote wildlife conservation and environmental protection.

Harrison Ford TV Public Service Announcements on Wildlife Trafficking

The U.S. Department of State, in partnership with WildAid, has produced three television public service announcements (PSAs) to combat wildlife trafficking featuring renowned actor Harrison Ford. More than 30 U.S. embassies in all regions of the world will showcase the PSAs in a global launch beginning June 5, World Environment Day. The ads will also be broadcast globally on television and cable stations.

Ideas of Chinese Youth to Feature in Global Wildlife Preservation Ads

A wildlife preservation group will create public service ads to be shown worldwide based on ideas by young people in China.

San Francisco-based WildAid and local partner Tencent, a major Chinese website, ended a six-month solicitation period for ad ideas Thursday.

Nine suggestions from Chinese youth, mostly college students, were chosen from among 2,160 candidates by environment experts, officials and votes from netizens on www.tencent.com.

Xinhua, WildAid to cooperate on raising wildlife preservation

The department of video and audio programs under China's official Xinhua News Agency is to cooperate with the WildAid to create public service ads to promote the preservation of threatened and endangered species.

The two sides signed an agreement Friday, under which the WildAid, a San Francisco-based wildlife preservation group, will fund the production of the advertisements on environmental issues agreed by both sides.

The Xinhua video and audio department will air the ads in its TV programs and broadcast media to be developed, according to the agreement.

Chinese belly-gods warn: Eating shark fins to have ecological, health consequences

A London-based environmental advocate warned Monday that preying on sharks merely for the fins will not only harm the ecological system, but may also be bad for the health of consumers.

Steve Trent, president of U.S.-headquartered Wild Aid, said it was important for China, the world's largest consumer of shark fins, to promote public awareness of the protection of this animal which is feared on the verge of extinction.

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