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Climate Change

How can you help coral reefs?

Coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef (ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies)

Last month, aerial studies conducted by scientists revealed devastating coral bleaching in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef due to record-breaking temperatures this year caused by climate change.

Can Reefs Survive Coral Bleaching?

Parrotfish in the Gardens of the Queen (Noel Lopez Fernandez)

Scientists in Australia recently announced that more than 90% of coral reefs in the Great Barrier Reef have experienced bleaching this year due to increased oceanic temperatures from climate change. This is the third mass bleaching event on record and possibly the worst yet — affecting one-third of the world’s corals. Other affected areas include Micronesia, as well as the Caribbean and Hawaii, both of which suffered major bleaching throughout their waters last summer.

Coral reefs provide food and shelter for numerous marine species and they support fish stocks that feed more than one billion people around the world. According to The New York Times, they provide jobs for “an estimated 30 million small-scale fishermen and women [who] depend on reefs for their livelihoods.”

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In China, 'Hairy Nose' PSA Fights Smog with Humor

BEIJING (February 25, 2016) — Air pollution in China is unavoidable. Last year, 366 out of 366 cities surveyed failed to meet World Health Organization air quality standards, including Beijing. So perhaps it’s unsurprising that a recent WildAid report found that over 90% of Chinese are concerned about air pollution. 

24-hour Rally to stop Keystone XL Pipeline

daryl-hannah-keystone-protest.gi.jpeg

Thought the pipeline was dead? So did we.

Climate

As a result of rapid economic development, 16 of the world’s 20 most polluted cities are now in China. A recent study by China’s Center for Disease Prevention and Control reported that more than 17 provinces in China show heavy air pollution that negatively impacts over 600 million people. Pollution from transportation, city-generated waste, food production, and energy production and usage are elevating China’s exposure to catastrophic habitat destruction, natural resource exhaustion and climate change. 

Though residents in cities such as Beijing are in accord that climate change is a problem, roughly 1 in 3 people still feel that tackling climate change is not their responsibility. A 2013 survey showed that less than 13% of residents were able to name five simple and effective things they could do to help protect the environment. 

With the rise of China’s middle class, younger generations hold the key to China’s climate change future.