Pledge About

China

U.S. Conservation Group WildAid Joins Shark-Fin Protest at Hong Kong Disneyland

U.S. conservation group WildAid joins shark-fin protest at Hong Kong Disneyland The U.S.-based conservation group WildAid has joined a campaign against Hong Kong Disneyland's plan to sell shark fin soup on its banquet menu at the park's hotel, the organization said Friday.

A WildAid statement accused Disneyland of being "hypocritical" by serving shark fin while saying it cares about the environment.

Disney Ditches Shark's Fin

The scoresheet reads Sharks 1, Mickey Mouse 0. In what was seen as a monumental climbdown by the directors of the world's magical wonderland, Disney announced Friday it will not be serving the traditional shark's fin soup at its Chinese wedding banquets when the Hong Kong theme park opens September 12.

Hidden Cost of Shark Fin Soup: Its Source May Vanish

Early every morning, the cold water lapping up on the beach here is stained red with blood as surly, determined men in ragged T-shirts drag hundreds of shark carcasses off wooden skiffs and onto the white sand.

Using eight-inch boning knives with quick precision, they dismember the once-mighty predators, cutting off heads, carving up big slabs of meat, slashing off the tails. Most important, they cut off the fins - dorsal and pectorals - a "set" that can fetch $100 or more.

Wildlife Conservation Program Marks 10 Years

"When the buying stops, the killing can stop, too."

If there is a diminishing demand for rhino horns, elephant tusks, tiger furs and bones, bear claws and bile, and sharks' fins, then the poaching and killing of endangered animals will gradually decline.

This was the message of Peter Knights, a British environmentalist and conservationist running the San Francisco-based WildAid, as he spoke in Taipei to mark the considerable progress made in the campaign to save endangered species.

Conservation Groups Say More Chinese Avoid Eating Wild Animals

The percentage of Chinese eating wild animals has gone down, mainly due to fears of diseases such as SARS. But at the same time total consumption of exotic wildlife has increased.

More and more Chinese refrain from eating rare animals such as pangolins, civet cats or bears. A nationwide survey, released by U.S. and Chinese conservation groups in Beijing on Tuesday, shows that nearly three quarters of the people interviewed did not consume wildlife in the past year.

Pages