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Bigger Bite Needed into Appetite for Shark Fin Soup

Campaigns featuring some of China’s biggest celebrities, including basketball star Yao Ming and actor Jackie Chan, have persuaded some Chinese to think twice about eating shark fin soup. But changing attitudes about the centuries-old delicacy, a large contributor to decimated shark populations, continues to be a challenge.

For many Chinese, the soup, which dates back the Ming Dynasty, is considered a matter of wealth and prestige, often featured at weddings and banquets. Some also believe shark fin has medicinal value, despite a lack of scientific evidence.

Extinct for Soup? WildAid featured in Alert Diver

After 409 million years, are sharks really facing extinction for an Asian delicacy? If you ask Hawaii state Senator Clayton Hee, cutting the fins off a great white shark is no different than cutting the horn off a black rhinoceros. It's a barbaric practice, and the bounty should be treated as contraband. He's right.

Assembly Bill 376 Banning Shark Fin Passes Key Committee in California Senate

Yesterday the California Senate’s Natural Resources Committee voted 5-0 (with two abstentions) to support AB 376, outlawing the possession, sale, trade and distribution of shark fins in California with a strong proviso that some type of amendment be incorporated to allow the possibility of some shark fin from “sustainable” sources.

California Moves To Protect Sharks

California Assembly Members Paul Fong and Jared Huffman today introduced a bill to prohibit the sale of shark fins in California to the State Assembly. California is one of the largest sources of demand for shark fin outside Asia and this bill would represent a major step towards reducing pressure on shark populations. Furthermore the bill complements the ban introduced in both Hawaii and the Commonwealth of North Mariana Islands (CNMI) as well as restrictions established by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT).

China: Lawmaker urges shark fin trading ban

A Chinese lawmaker has proposed that the country's top legislature ban the trade of shark fin, a high-end delicacy consumed by wealthy people in China and East Asia.

Shark-fin trading generates enormous profits, but encourages overfishing and brutal slaughter of sharks, of which some 30 species are near extinction, said Ding Liguo, deputy to the National People's Congress, the top legislature.

He has filed a formal written proposal to the legislature, together with a dozen of other lawmakers.

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