WildAid Japan and Tears of the African Elephant call on Japan to end its ivory trade

WildAid Japan and Tears of the African Elephant call on Japan to end its ivory trade starting with abandoning ivory hanko stamps. Roughly 80% of Japan’s ivory consumption is for hankos, which are used to sign official documents, like marriage licenses and business contracts. Replacing ivory with other materials, such as wood or stone, would reduce demand for ivory from wild elephants.

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Wildlife trafficking is a multi-billion dollar criminal industry

Driven by demand in expanding economies, the illegal trade in wildlife products threatens the survival of endangered species. WildAid’s programs persuade consumers to stop buying illicit products like ivory, rhino horn and shark fin soup. We also work with leaders, partners and communities to protect marine reserves, reduce climate change impacts, and increase support for conservation.

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